Backpack Rain Cover

In my review of the Everki Atlas, I pointed that the outside pocket might collect water if it rains. While the rest of the backpack’s contents will be fine, items in that pocket might get wet. Everki does sell a backpack rain cover that can protect the backpack but it is outrageously expensive. Instead, I got the Ayamaya 40L raincover from Amazon. It is a fraction of the price and easily fits the Atlas.

Moving from Blogger to Hugo

I really liked Blogger and I’ve hosted my blog on it since 2011. It was free (still is), but still had all the essentials features for a blog at the time and I like that it was integrated with Google. My blogging needs haven’t changed since then but the world have evolved and Blogger no longer have all the essential features necessary for a blogging platform. Specifically, I’m talking about Blogger’s lack of support for SSL/TLS for custom domains.

Setting up HTTPS on App Engine With a Custom Domain

The Go programming language provides a great tool, go get, to fetch packages. A common use case is to get a package that is hosted on Github: go get -u github.com/abc/xyz This works okay but requires your local source to also be under src/github.com/abc/xyz to keep the import paths consistent with users that got the package with get. If GitHub goes away or the code need to move to another location then it could potentially break users.
Hootoo Travelmate Elite and Using Chromecast In Hotels

Hootoo Travelmate Elite and Using Chromecast In Hotels

Our family always brings a Chromecast with us when we travel so we can watch our video library on the TV. The challenge has always been getting it to work in hotels especially ones that require a password to access its wifi. The easiest solution is to have a travel router that connects to the hotel’s wifi and have all the devices (chromecast, phone/tablet) connect to the travel router. Only the router needs to be configured to access the hotel network and all your devices access the Internet through the router.

Everki Atlas Review

I’ve been using a Victorinox backpack for many years whenever I’ve had to travel. I can’t find a link to it since it’s no longer being made, but it is very well made, TSA friendly, side-loading laptop compartment, allows for good organization and can hold a good amount of items). It is not a light backpack and is pretty heavy when loaded up. Especially when traveling with the family which increases the number of electronics, I definitely started to feel the weight.

Accessing Github Through SSH As Different Users

To set up access to Github using different accounts, start by creating ssh keys for each account. $ cd ~/.ssh $ ssh-keygen -t rsa -C "github-acct1" -f "github-acct1" Then add the ssh key to the Github account. Next, create ~/.ssh/config to tell ssh when to use which account: # Github account #1 Host github.com-acct1 HostName github.com User git IdentityFile ~/.ssh/github-acct1 # Github account #2 Host github.com-acct2 HostName github.com User git IdentityFile ~/.

Yubikey, U2F and protecting your accounts

Setting up 2-factor authentication is an important step to keeping your online accounts safe. For many people, this comes in the form of having an additional code that must be entered in addition to their passwords such as those that is sent to their phones through SMS or using an app like Google Authenticator. Admittedly, this additional security comes with an additional inconvenience of needing to have your phone nearby and looking up the code which probably turns off a lot people.

Google Wifi, mesh networks, redundancy

Google Wifi is a new device that can create a wireless network “mesh” by simply adding wifi points to your network. It is super simple to setup. Simply plug it in and add it to your home network through the mobile app. Setting up a home network usually involves having a router (likely with wifi capabilities) that devices connect to. Single router solutions like Asus RT-ac68u and Google OnHubs have very good reach and for most situations are going to be all you need.

My System (2015)

In a blink of an eye, two years has passed since I upgraded my primary system and it seems to be true that we’ve arrived at the end of Moore’s Law as I’ve not felt an urge to upgrade the system. I’ve not noticed slow down in performance of what I do on a day-to-day basis on the system which is primarily coding with VIM and browsing with Chrome. I don’t use this system for gaming and Linux is my primary OS which might contribute to everything still being relevant.

My Favorite 'Management' Books

Besides the books that I’ve previously listed, here are some books that are more focused on management rather then software engineering or technical project management that I’ve found to still be good reads for engineers. The First 90 Daysgives advice on how to transition into new roles with case studies on do’s and don’t. I found it useful in helping to develop a learning plan for myself whenever I start on a new team or in a new role.